Zero Waste with with Allergies, Intolerances and specific diets

Zero Waste with with Allergies, Intolerances and specific diets

Zero Waste living is hard enough, and with the added complexities you get with being unable to eat even more food groups, it can be even tougher.

I can’t eat gluten and dairy, as I have intolerances to both. I also have a very mild reaction to certain seeds. My reactions can be anything from eczema to an upset tummy, being excessively tired and having to poop (a lot).

The worst things I find about allergies and intolerances when it comes to Zero Waste living are:

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My quest to get ZERO junk mail

My quest to get ZERO junk mail

I get a whole loada junk mail.

It feels like now I’ve got adulty things like credit cards, marketers have decided I have an obscene amount of cash (this is entirely untrue!) and want to go on fancy holidays, get another credit card, change my broadband provider to a much more expensive one and just spend spend spend.

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Food preparation for Zero Waste

Food preparation for Zero Waste

The zero waste lifestyle does take more effort than the standard consumerist one, mostly because of how organised you have to be. 

For me, its preparing food which takes the longest, but luckily I LOVE to cook. I’m always looking for ways to reclaim time and make the whole process smoother.

I’ve got my food waste to zero through these 5 steps. Heck, they’re not rocket science! They’re pretty much common sense, but they have made a huge difference to me, and reduced my food waste considerably.

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What's in the (zero waste!) bag?

What's in the (zero waste!) bag?

I tend to find that the times I’m most likely to produce waste are when I am out and about for work or trips, and maybe haven’t had enough time to prepare for the day as I would like.

Carrying round certain things in my backpack ensures that I can still minimize waste, even if I haven’t had the time to do full meal prep. I opt for a backpack as I tend to carry quite a bit of stuff alongside what is listed below. It's a personal choice how much of these things you want to take around, and how big your bag will need to be to accommodate that.

Cutlery

Anna uses a spork, I carry around a fork from my cutlery drawer. Depending on what you like to eat, you might consider a spoon or chopsticks instead. Also, if you like drinking with a straw, you could purchase a reusable one made from stainless steel, glass or bamboo.

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6 reasons reusable sanitary items are The Actual Best thing ever

6 reasons reusable sanitary items are The Actual Best thing ever

I’ve used reusable sanitary products for about three years now. It was one of the first changes I made on my zero waste journey as it was a nice secretive one to begin with.

Here are our 6 reasons reusable sanitary products are the best! 

Once you've got it, it's freeeee!

The standard moon cup costs about £20 as a one-off spend, unlike disposables, which need to be purchased on the regular. You’ll pay for your reusable within the first 3-6 cycles and then it's 100% free! All you'll need to do is clean it!

Whatcha going to spend that spare cash on?!

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